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Editorial Policy: Standard of Reporting

Abd. Kakhar Umar
Tuesday, 14 February 2023

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The purpose of reporting guidelines is to ensure the transparency and accuracy of research findings, and to facilitate their interpretation and replication by others. In order to achieve these goals, it is essential for authors to follow established reporting standards for their specific type of study. These standards provide a framework for authors to clearly describe their methods and results, and to ensure that all relevant information is included in their publication. Adherence to these guidelines also promotes consistency and comparability across studies, and helps to maintain the integrity and trust of the scientific community. By following these reporting guidelines, authors can ensure that their research is effectively and accurately communicated to others, and that its impact on the advancement of knowledge is maximized.

Randomized Controlled Trials (RCTs):
  • Consolidated Standards of Reporting Trials (CONSORT) Statement
  • Standard Protocol Items: Recommendations for Interventional Trials (SPIRIT) Checklist
Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses:
  • Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) Statement
  • Cochrane Handbook for Systematic Reviews of Interventions
Observational Studies:
  • Strengthening the Reporting of Observational Studies in Epidemiology (STROBE) Statement
Diagnostic Accuracy Studies:
  • Standards for Reporting of Diagnostic Accuracy (STARD) Checklist
Clinical Case Reports:
  • CARE (Case Report) Checklist
Animal Studies:
  • ARRIVE (Animal Research: Reporting In Vivo Experiments) Guidelines
Environmental Health Studies:
  • Strengthening the Reporting of Observational Studies in Epidemiology for Environmental and Occupational Health (STROBE-EE) Statement
Non-randomized Interventional Studies:
  • Template for Intervention Description and Replication (TIDieR) Checklist
Qualitative Studies:
  • Consolidated Criteria for Reporting Qualitative Research (COREQ) Checklist
Health Technology Assessment Studies:
  • International Society for Pharmacoeconomics and Outcomes Research (ISPOR) Good Research Practices Task Force Recommendations
Economic Evaluation Studies:
  • Guide for the Economic Evaluation of Health Technologies: Canada (GHTC) Checklist
Network Meta-Analyses:
  • Network Meta-analysis in Health Research: A Handbook for Evidence Synthesis (NMA Handbook)
Mixed-Methods Studies:
  • Consolidated Criteria for Reporting Qualitative and Mixed Methods Studies (COREQ-MM) Checklist

These reporting guidelines help authors to present their research in a consistent, comprehensive, and transparent manner, regardless of the type of study, and help to ensure that the research is easily understood, interpretable, and replicable by others in the scientific community.

Nomenclature

Nomenclature is an essential aspect of scientific communication, as it provides a standardized system for naming and classifying things, including scientific and medical terms, chemical compounds, and biological entities. In order to promote clarity and consistency in scientific communication, it is necessary to have a standardized nomenclature policy.

This policy applies to all scientific and technical documents produced by the organization, including research articles, grant proposals, conference presentations, and reports. The policy covers all nomenclature used in these documents, including but not limited to scientific and medical terms, chemical compounds, biological entities, and genetic sequences.

Guidelines:

Scientific and Medical Terms: Scientific and medical terms should be used consistently and accurately, and should be defined in a way that is easily understood by the target audience.

Chemical Compounds: Chemical compounds should be named according to established international nomenclature systems, such as the International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry (IUPAC) or the International Organization for Standardization (ISO).

Biological Entities: Biological entities, such as species, genera, and taxa, should be named according to established international nomenclature systems, such as the International Code of Nomenclature for algae, fungi, and plants, or the International Code of Zoological Nomenclature.

Genetic Sequences: Genetic sequences should be named according to established international nomenclature systems, such as the Human Genome Variation Society (HGVS) or the Genome Reference Consortium (GRC).

This nomenclature policy is intended to promote clarity and consistency in scientific communication, and to ensure that all scientific and technical documents produced by the organization are accurate, understandable, and comparable. By following these guidelines, authors, editors, and reviewers can help to advance the quality and credibility of scientific research and communication.

Tags:

Scientific communication Standardized naming systems Accuracy and consistency Genetic sequence nomenclature International nomenclature systems

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