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ACS Style

Das, S., Jamatia, T. NanoPhytoformulations: what is so interesting about the nanoscale?. Sciences of Phytochemistry 2022, 1(2), 34-36.

AMA Style

Das, S, Jamatia, T. NanoPhytoformulations: what is so interesting about the nanoscale?. Sciences of Phytochemistry. 2022; 1(2):34-36.

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Sanjoy Das, Taison Jamatia. 2022. "NanoPhytoformulations: what is so interesting about the nanoscale?" Sciences of Phytochemistry 1, no. 2:34-36.

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Home / Sciences of Phytochemistry / Volume 1 Issue 2 / 10.58920/sciphy01020034

Opinion/Perspective

NanoPhytoformulations: what is so interesting about the nanoscale?

by Sanjoy Das , Taison Jamatia

Academic editor: James H. Zothantluanga
Sciences of Phytochemistry 1(2): 34-36 (2022); https://doi.org/10.58920/sciphy01020034
This article is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution (CC BY) 4.0 International License.


Received
21 Nov 2022
Revised
29 Nov 2022
Accepted
29 Nov 2022
Published
29 Nov 2022

Abstract: Nanotechnology is on the threshold of providing a host of new materials and approaches in revolutionizing the medical and pharmaceutical fields. The incorporation of nanotechnology in herbal formulation investigation has a huge number of benefits for phytomedicine such as enhancement of solubility and bioavailability, reinforcement of pharmacological activity, improvement of stability, protection from toxicity, sustained delivery, and safeguarding from physical or chemical degradation. This opinion paper briefly highlights the authors perspective on herbal nanotechnology through few key points.

Keywords: Natural productsPhytoconstituentsNanotechnologyBioactivityDrug delivery


1.        Introduction

Nature is an alluring source of novel therapeutic entities with plants, animals, marine, and microorganisms all contributing to drugs with potential applications in the prevention of many diseases (1). Apart from all these sources, plants have been convincing as a crucial origin of drugs since ancient times with over 50-60 % of currently used therapeutic agents borrowed from natural sources (2,3).

2. Nanotechnology and phytocompounds

Entrusted blueprints reported in Ayurvedic medicines are particularly phytochemical extracted components, used alone or in combination from historic times. The herbal phytochemicals or phytomedicine show their potency in various ways viz., inhibition of overexpressed enzymes, proteins amino acids, hormones and simultaneously accelerating the production of protective enzymes. Moreover, phytochemicals have proven antioxidant and relative oxygen generation capacity by regulating various pathways. These physicochemical characteristics help to boost immunity and do not affect healthy cells to a certain concentration resulting in the usage of phytomedicine have been increased (4). However, the therapeutic potency of any drug that may be obtained from plants or synthetic sources is fully dependent upon the ability of the dosage form to deliver the medicament to the desired site at a sufficient rate and bulk to evoke the pertinent pharmacological response. The phytomedicines display excellent in vitro activity but inferior in vivo efficiency due to their less water solubility, inappropriate molecular size, and lipophilicity leading to low absorption and hence poor systemic availability. A better perceptive of the pharmacokinetics, as well as biopharmaceutics of phytomedicines, can also help in engineering rational dosage forms (5). Nanotechnology is on the threshold of providing a host of new materials and approaches in revolutionizing the medical and pharmaceutical fields. The incorporation of nanotechnology in herbal formulation investigation has a huge number of benefits for phytomedicine such as enhancement of solubility and bioavailability, reinforcement of pharmacological activity, improvement of stability, protection from toxicity, sustained delivery, and safeguarding from physical or chemical degradation. There are diverse forms of nanotechnological approaches available for the delivery of phytomedicines like polymeric, lipid, metal or inorganic, magnetic, quantum dot, carbon nanotube, and vesicular nanocarriers. As these nanocarrier-constructed materials are architected at the molecular, atomic, and macromolecular levels, they are generally small-sized particles (1-1000 nm) with unique physicochemical characteristics like size, surface properties, and shape. The particle size and surface properties of the nanocarriers can be modified easily for both passive (by coating certain types of polymers) and active targets (by attaching target ligands to the outer surface of the nanocarrier which will help to attain site-specific delivery). Being nano ranged, these tiny particles can efficiently penetrate the tissues or cells, expedite more uptake of the phytoconstituents, directly interreact with diseased cells or tissues with improved efficiency and ensure better therapeutic action. Besides these impressive facts about nanotechnology, extensive research and clinical studies are still needed to properly justify the nanotechnological approach for phytoformulations regarding the optimization of phytoconstituents during preparation, scale-up, and toxicity issues (6,7).

3.        Conclusion

Finally, in the end, the authors are optimistic that in near future, nanophytoformulation will surely find its place in the repository of advanced therapy.

Declarations

Acknowledgment

The authors are thankful to the Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Dibrugarh University, Dibrugarh, Assam, India for providing the platform to conduct this work.

Ethics Statement

Not applicable.

Data Availability

Not applicable.

Funding Information

Not applicable.

Conflict of Interest

The authors declare no conflicting interest.

Reference

  1. Lim CL, Raju CS, Mahboob T, Kayesth S, Gupta KK, Jain GK, Dhobi M, Nawaz M, Wilairatana P, de Lourdes Pereira M, Patra JK, Paul AK, Rahmatullah M, Nissapatorn V (2022) Precision and advanced nano-phytopharmaceuticals for therapeutic applications. Nanomaterials 12, 238. http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/nano12020238.
  2. Cragg GM, Newman DJ (2013) Natural products: a continuing source of novel drug leads. Biochim Biophys Acta 1830, 3670-3695. http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.bbagen.2013.02.008.
  3. Mushtaq S, Abbasi BH, Uzair B, Abbasi R (2018) Natural products as reservoirs of novel therapeutic agents. EXCLI J 17, 420-451. http://dx.doi.org/10.17179/excli2018-1174.
  4. More MP, Pardeshi SR, Pardeshi CV, Sonawane GA, Shinde MN, Deshmukh PK, Naik JB, Kulkarni AD (2021) Recent advances in phytochemical-based nano-formulation for drug-resistant cancer. Med Drug Discov 10, 100082. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.medidd.2021.100082.
  5. Gunasekaran T, Haile T, Nigusse T, Dhanaraju MD (2014) Nanotechnology: an effective tool for enhancing bioavailability and bioactivity of phytomedicine. Asian Pac J Trop Biomed 2014 4, S1-S7. https://doi.org/10.12980/APJTB.4.2014C980.
  6. Jeevanandam J, Barhoum A, Chan YS, Dufresne A, Danquah MK (2018) Review on nanoparticles and nanostructured materials: history, sources, toxicity and regulations. Beilstein J Nanotechnol 9, 1050-1074. https://doi.org/10.3762/bjnano.9.98.
  7. Rajagopal M, Paul AK, Lee MT, Joykin AR, Por CS, Mahboob T, Salibay CC, Torres MS, Guiang MMM, Rahmatullah M, Jahan R, Jannat K, Wilairatana P, de Lourdes Pereira M, Lim CL, Nissapatorn V (2022) Phytochemicals and nano-phytopharmaceuticals use in skin, urogenital and locomotor disorders: are we there?. Plants 11, 1265. https://doi.org/10.3390/plants11091265.

Citation
ACS Style

Das, S., Jamatia, T. NanoPhytoformulations: what is so interesting about the nanoscale?. Sciences of Phytochemistry 2022, 1(2), 34-36.

AMA Style

Das, S, Jamatia, T. NanoPhytoformulations: what is so interesting about the nanoscale?. Sciences of Phytochemistry. 2022; 1(2):34-36.

Chicago Style

Sanjoy Das, Taison Jamatia. 2022. "NanoPhytoformulations: what is so interesting about the nanoscale?" Sciences of Phytochemistry 1, no. 2:34-36.

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